Occupation Health Testing Badger, CA

If you are an employer or individual in need of occupational health testing services, Occupational Health Testing USA provides occupational health screenings for all OSHA and DOT job requirements at many locations in Badger, CA and the surrounding areas. Our occupational health testing services are available for employers in need of pre-employment, post-accident, fit for duty or annual testing requirements. We also provide testing for individuals in need of any employment or personal related health evaluations. In many cases, our Badger, CA locations are within minutes of your home or office and same day service is available.

Occupational Health Services In Badger, CA

  • DOT Physicals (FMCSA, PHMSA, FAA, FRA, FTA, USCG 719K/E)
  • Pre-Employment Physicals
  • Audiograms
  • TB Chest X-ray
  • EKG
  • Lab Metabolic Panel
  • Lab Lipid + Glucose Panel
  • Lab – Hep B Panel
  • Lab- MMR Titer
  • Kraus Weber Lower Back Evaluation
  • Lift Test
  • OSHA Respirator Questionnaire
  • Respirator Fit Test – Qualitative
  • Respirator Fit Test – Quantitative
  • Hep B Vaccination
  • MMR Vaccine
  • TDAP Vaccine
  • TP/PPD Skin Test
  • Varicella Vaccine #1
  • Vision Test Ishihara
  • Vision Test Snellen
  • Vision Test Jaeger
  • Drug Testing
  • Alcohol Testing

Occupational Testing Locations in Badger, CA

(Not All Testing Centers Perform All Tests)

What is Occupational Health

Occupational health is a field of healthcare involving multiple fields dedicated to the well-being and safety of employees in the workplace, with a strong focus on injury prevention and education. Some occupational health services include employee wellness, Pre-placement services, ergonomics, occupational therapy, and occupational medicine.

Occupational health refers to the identification and control of the risks arising from physical, chemical, and other workplace hazards in order to establish and maintain a safe and healthy working environment. These hazards may include chemical agents and solvents, heavy metals such as lead and mercury, physical agents such as loud noise or vibration, and physical hazards such as electricity or dangerous machinery.

Since 1986, the NIEHS has supported training and education programs designed to protect workers and their communities from exposure to toxic materials encountered during hazardous waste operations and chemical emergency response. This includes safety and health training for workers who are involved in hazardous waste removal and comprehensive training and environmental restoration for residents living near heavily polluted industrial waste sites.

Local Area Info: Badger

Badgers are short-legged omnivores in the families Mustelidae (which also includes the otters, polecats, weasels, and wolverines), and Mephitidae (which also includes the skunks). They are not a natural taxonomic grouping, but are united by possession of a squat body adapted for fossorial activity. All belong to the caniform suborder of carnivoran mammals. The 11 species of mustelid badgers are grouped in four subfamilies: Melinae (4 species, including the European badger), Helictidinae (5 species of ferret-badger), Mellivorinae (the honey badger or ratel), and Taxideinae (the American badger); the respective genera are Arctonyx, Meles, Melogale, Mellivora and Taxidea. Badgers include the most basal mustelids; the American badger is the most basal of all, followed successively by the ratel and Melinae; the estimated split dates are about 17.8, 15.5 and 14.8 million years ago, respectively. The two species of Asiatic stink badgers of the genus Mydaus were formerly included within Melinae (and thus Mustelidae), but more recent genetic evidence indicates these are actually members of the skunk family.

Badger mandibular condyles connect to long cavities in their skulls, which gives resistance to jaw dislocation and increases their bite grip strength. This in turn limits jaw movement to hinging open and shut, or sliding from side to side, but it does not hamper the twisting movement possible for the jaws of most mammals.

Badgers have rather short, wide bodies, with short legs for digging. They have elongated, weasel-like heads with small ears. Their tails vary in length depending on species; the stink badger has a very short tail, while the ferret badger's tail can be 4651cm (1820in) long, depending on age. They have black faces with distinctive white markings, grey bodies with a light-coloured stripe from head to tail, and dark legs with light-coloured underbellies. They grow to around 90cm (35in) in length including tail.

For more information or to schedule an occupational health testing service call our scheduling department or schedule your test online 24/7.