Occupation Health Testing Beaver, OR

If you are an employer or individual in need of occupational health testing services, Occupational Health Testing USA provides occupational health screenings for all OSHA and DOT job requirements at many locations in Beaver, OR and the surrounding areas. Our occupational health testing services are available for employers in need of pre-employment, post-accident, fit for duty or annual testing requirements. We also provide testing for individuals in need of any employment or personal related health evaluations. In many cases, our Beaver, OR locations are within minutes of your home or office and same day service is available.

Occupational Health Services In Beaver, OR

  • DOT Physicals (FMCSA, PHMSA, FAA, FRA, FTA, USCG 719K/E)
  • Pre-Employment Physicals
  • Audiograms
  • TB Chest X-ray
  • EKG
  • Lab Metabolic Panel
  • Lab Lipid + Glucose Panel
  • Lab – Hep B Panel
  • Lab- MMR Titer
  • Kraus Weber Lower Back Evaluation
  • Lift Test
  • OSHA Respirator Questionnaire
  • Respirator Fit Test – Qualitative
  • Respirator Fit Test – Quantitative
  • Hep B Vaccination
  • MMR Vaccine
  • TDAP Vaccine
  • TP/PPD Skin Test
  • Varicella Vaccine #1
  • Vision Test Ishihara
  • Vision Test Snellen
  • Vision Test Jaeger
  • Drug Testing
  • Alcohol Testing

Occupational Testing Locations in Beaver, OR

(Not All Testing Centers Perform All Tests)

What is Occupational Health

Occupational health is a field of healthcare involving multiple fields dedicated to the well-being and safety of employees in the workplace, with a strong focus on injury prevention and education. Some occupational health services include employee wellness, Pre-placement services, ergonomics, occupational therapy, and occupational medicine.

Occupational health refers to the identification and control of the risks arising from physical, chemical, and other workplace hazards in order to establish and maintain a safe and healthy working environment. These hazards may include chemical agents and solvents, heavy metals such as lead and mercury, physical agents such as loud noise or vibration, and physical hazards such as electricity or dangerous machinery.

Since 1986, the NIEHS has supported training and education programs designed to protect workers and their communities from exposure to toxic materials encountered during hazardous waste operations and chemical emergency response. This includes safety and health training for workers who are involved in hazardous waste removal and comprehensive training and environmental restoration for residents living near heavily polluted industrial waste sites.

Local Area Info: Beaver

The beaver (genus Castor) is a large, primarily nocturnal, semiaquatic rodent. Castor includes two extant species, the North American beaver (Castor canadensis) (native to North America) and Eurasian beaver (Castor fiber) (Eurasia). Beavers are known for building dams, canals, and lodges (homes). They are the second-largest rodent in the world (after the capybara). Their colonies create one or more dams to provide still, deep water to protect against predators, and to float food and building material. The North American beaver population was once more than 60 million, but as of 1988 was 612 million. This population decline is the result of extensive hunting for fur, for glands used as medicine and perfume, and because the beavers' harvesting of trees and flooding of waterways may interfere with other land uses.

Beavers, along with pocket gophers and kangaroo rats, are castorimorph rodents, a suborder of rodents mostly restricted to North America. Although just two closely related species exist today, beavers have a long fossil history in the Northern Hemisphere beginning in the Eocene, and many species of giant beaver existed until quite recently, such as Trogontherium in Europe, and Castoroides in North America.

Beavers are known for their natural trait of building dams on rivers and streams, and building their homes (known as "lodges") in the resulting pond. Beavers also build canals to float building materials that are difficult to haul over land. They use powerful front teeth to cut trees and other plants that they use both for building and for food. In the absence of existing ponds, beavers must construct dams before building their lodges. First they place vertical poles, then fill between the poles with a crisscross of horizontally placed branches. They fill in the gaps between the branches with a combination of weeds and mud until the dam impounds sufficient water to surround the lodge.

For more information or to schedule an occupational health testing service call our scheduling department or schedule your test online 24/7.