Occupation Health Testing Best, TX

If you are an employer or individual in need of occupational health testing services, Occupational Health Testing USA provides occupational health screenings for all OSHA and DOT job requirements at many locations in Best, TX and the surrounding areas. Our occupational health testing services are available for employers in need of pre-employment, post-accident, fit for duty or annual testing requirements. We also provide testing for individuals in need of any employment or personal related health evaluations. In many cases, our Best, TX locations are within minutes of your home or office and same day service is available.

Occupational Health Services In Best, TX

  • DOT Physicals (FMCSA, PHMSA, FAA, FRA, FTA, USCG 719K/E)
  • Pre-Employment Physicals
  • Audiograms
  • TB Chest X-ray
  • EKG
  • Lab Metabolic Panel
  • Lab Lipid + Glucose Panel
  • Lab – Hep B Panel
  • Lab- MMR Titer
  • Kraus Weber Lower Back Evaluation
  • Lift Test
  • OSHA Respirator Questionnaire
  • Respirator Fit Test – Qualitative
  • Respirator Fit Test – Quantitative
  • Hep B Vaccination
  • MMR Vaccine
  • TDAP Vaccine
  • TP/PPD Skin Test
  • Varicella Vaccine #1
  • Vision Test Ishihara
  • Vision Test Snellen
  • Vision Test Jaeger
  • Drug Testing
  • Alcohol Testing

Occupational Testing Locations in Best, TX

(Not All Testing Centers Perform All Tests)

805 N MAIN AVE 9.6 miles

805 N MAIN AVE
BIG LAKE, TX 76932
Categories: BIG LAKE TX

What is Occupational Health

Occupational health is a field of healthcare involving multiple fields dedicated to the well-being and safety of employees in the workplace, with a strong focus on injury prevention and education. Some occupational health services include employee wellness, Pre-placement services, ergonomics, occupational therapy, and occupational medicine.

Occupational health refers to the identification and control of the risks arising from physical, chemical, and other workplace hazards in order to establish and maintain a safe and healthy working environment. These hazards may include chemical agents and solvents, heavy metals such as lead and mercury, physical agents such as loud noise or vibration, and physical hazards such as electricity or dangerous machinery.

Since 1986, the NIEHS has supported training and education programs designed to protect workers and their communities from exposure to toxic materials encountered during hazardous waste operations and chemical emergency response. This includes safety and health training for workers who are involved in hazardous waste removal and comprehensive training and environmental restoration for residents living near heavily polluted industrial waste sites.

Local Area Info: Therapy

Therapy (often abbreviated tx, Tx, or Tx) is the attempted remediation of a health problem, usually following a diagnosis. In the medical field, it is usually synonymous with treatment (also abbreviated tx or Tx). Among psychologists and other mental health professionals, including psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, counselors, and clinical social workers, the term may refer specifically to psychotherapy (sometimes dubbed 'talking therapy'). The English word therapy comes via Latin therap?a from Greek: ???????? and literally means "curing" or "healing".

The words care, therapy, treatment, and intervention overlap in a semantic field, and thus they can be synonymous depending on context. Moving rightward through that order, the connotative level of holism decreases and the level of specificity (to concrete instances) increases. Thus, in health care contexts (where its senses are always noncount), the word care tends to imply a broad idea of everything done to protect or improve someone's health (for example, as in the terms preventive care and primary care, which connote ongoing action), although it sometimes implies a narrower idea (for example, in the simplest cases of wound care or postanesthesia care, a few particular steps are sufficient, and the patient's interaction with that provider is soon finished). In contrast, the word intervention tends to be specific and concrete, and thus the word is often countable; for example, one instance of cardiac catheterization is one intervention performed, and coronary care (noncount) can require a series of interventions (count). At the extreme, the piling on of such countable interventions amounts to interventionism, a flawed model of care lacking holistic circumspectionmerely treating discrete problems (in billable increments) rather than maintaining health. Therapy and treatment, in the middle of the semantic field, can connote either the holism of care or the discreteness of intervention, with context conveying the intent in each use. Accordingly, they can be used in both noncount and count senses (for example, therapy for chronic kidney disease can involve several dialysis treatments per week).

Treatment decisions often follow formal or informal algorithmic guidelines. Treatment options can often be ranked or prioritized into lines of therapy: first-line therapy, second-line therapy, third-line therapy, and so on. First-line therapy (sometimes called induction therapy, primary therapy, or front-line therapy) is the first therapy that will be tried. Its priority over other options is usually either: (1) formally recommended on the basis of clinical trial evidence for its best-available combination of efficacy, safety, and tolerability or (2) chosen based on the clinical experience of the physician. If a first-line therapy either fails to resolve the issue or produces intolerable side effects, additional (second-line) therapies may be substituted or added to the treatment regimen, followed by third-line therapies, and so on.

For more information or to schedule an occupational health testing service call our scheduling department or schedule your test online 24/7.