Occupation Health Testing Big Moose, NY

If you are an employer or individual in need of occupational health testing services, Occupational Health Testing USA provides occupational health screenings for all OSHA and DOT job requirements at many locations in Big Moose, NY and the surrounding areas. Our occupational health testing services are available for employers in need of pre-employment, post-accident, fit for duty or annual testing requirements. We also provide testing for individuals in need of any employment or personal related health evaluations. In many cases, our Big Moose, NY locations are within minutes of your home or office and same day service is available.

Occupational Health Services In Big Moose, NY

  • DOT Physicals (FMCSA, PHMSA, FAA, FRA, FTA, USCG 719K/E)
  • Pre-Employment Physicals
  • Audiograms
  • TB Chest X-ray
  • EKG
  • Lab Metabolic Panel
  • Lab Lipid + Glucose Panel
  • Lab – Hep B Panel
  • Lab- MMR Titer
  • Kraus Weber Lower Back Evaluation
  • Lift Test
  • OSHA Respirator Questionnaire
  • Respirator Fit Test – Qualitative
  • Respirator Fit Test – Quantitative
  • Hep B Vaccination
  • MMR Vaccine
  • TDAP Vaccine
  • TP/PPD Skin Test
  • Varicella Vaccine #1
  • Vision Test Ishihara
  • Vision Test Snellen
  • Vision Test Jaeger
  • Drug Testing
  • Alcohol Testing

Occupational Testing Locations in Big Moose, NY

(Not All Testing Centers Perform All Tests)

8561 NEWCOMB RD 23.5 miles

8561 NEWCOMB RD
LONG LAKE, NY 12847
Categories: LONG LAKE NY

What is Occupational Health

Occupational health is a field of healthcare involving multiple fields dedicated to the well-being and safety of employees in the workplace, with a strong focus on injury prevention and education. Some occupational health services include employee wellness, Pre-placement services, ergonomics, occupational therapy, and occupational medicine.

Occupational health refers to the identification and control of the risks arising from physical, chemical, and other workplace hazards in order to establish and maintain a safe and healthy working environment. These hazards may include chemical agents and solvents, heavy metals such as lead and mercury, physical agents such as loud noise or vibration, and physical hazards such as electricity or dangerous machinery.

Since 1986, the NIEHS has supported training and education programs designed to protect workers and their communities from exposure to toxic materials encountered during hazardous waste operations and chemical emergency response. This includes safety and health training for workers who are involved in hazardous waste removal and comprehensive training and environmental restoration for residents living near heavily polluted industrial waste sites.

Local Area Info: Moose

The moose (North America) or elk (Eurasia), Alces alces is a member of the New World deer subfamily and is the largest and heaviest extant species in the Deer family. Moose are distinguished by the broad, palmate (open-hand shaped) antlers of the males; other members of the deer family have antlers with a dendritic ("twig-like") configuration. Moose typically inhabit boreal forests and temperate broadleaf and mixed forests of the Northern Hemisphere in temperate to subarctic climates. Hunting and other human activities have caused a reduction in the size of the moose's range over time. Moose have been reintroduced to some of their former habitats. Currently, most moose are found in Canada, Alaska, New England (with Maine having the most of the lower 48 states), Fennoscandia, Baltic states, and Russia. Their diet consists of both terrestrial and aquatic vegetation. The most common moose predators are the gray wolf along with bears and humans. Unlike most other deer species, moose do not form herds and are solitary animals, aside from calves who remain with their mother until the cow begins estrus (typically at 18 months after birth of the calf), at which point the cow chases away young bulls. Although generally slow-moving and sedentary, moose can become aggressive and move quickly if angered or startled. Their mating season in the autumn features energetic fights between males competing for a female.

Alces alces is called a "moose" in North American English, but an "elk" in British English; its scientific name comes from its name in Latin. The word "elk" in North American English refers to a completely different species of deer, the Cervus canadensis, also called the wapiti. A mature male moose is called a bull, a mature female a cow, and an immature moose of either sex a calf.

The word "elk" originated in Proto-Germanic, from which Old English evolved and has cognates in other Indo-European languages, e.g. elg in Danish/Norwegian; lg in Swedish; alnis in Latvian; Elch in German; and ?o? in Polish (Latin alc? or alc?s and Ancient Greek ???? lk? are probably Germanic loanwords). In the continental-European languages, these forms of the word "elk" almost always refer to the Alces alces.

For more information or to schedule an occupational health testing service call our scheduling department or schedule your test online 24/7.